What Is TLD Name Server?

by Mr. DNS on August 17, 2009 · 0 comments

in whatis

A TLD (top-level domain) is the highest level of domain names in the root zone of the DNS of the Internet. For all domains in lower levels, it is the last part of the domain name, that is, the label that follows the last dot of a fully qualified domain name. In other words the last part of an Internet domain name that follow the final dot of a fully qualified domain name. For example, in the domain name www.dnsknowledge.com, the top-level domain is com.

Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) looks after most top-level domain. It operates the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) and is responsible for maintaining the DNS root zone. DNS server which keeps all root zone is called TLD name server.

Generic top-level domains

There are different types of TLD name server. Initially this group consisted of GOV, EDU, COM, MIL, ORG, and NET.

TLDShort Description
aerothe air transport industry.
arpareserved exclusively to support operationally-critical infrastructural identifier spaces as advised by the Internet Architecture Board
asiacompanies. organisations and individuals in the Asia-Pacific region
bizbusiness use
catCatalan language/culture
comcommercial organizations, but unrestricted
coopcooperatives
edupost-secondary educational establishments
govgovernment entities within the United States at the federal, state, and local levels
infoinformational sites, but unrestricted
intinternational organizations established by treaty
jobsemployment-related sites
milthe U.S. military
mobisites catering to mobile devices
museummuseums
namefamilies and individuals
netoriginally for network infrastructures, now unrestricted
orgoriginally for organizations not clearly falling within the other gTLDs, now unrestricted
procertain professions
telservices involving connections between the telephone network and the Internet (added March 2, 2007)
traveltravel agents, airlines, hoteliers, tourism bureaus, etc.

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